PowerShell - GUI Tools & Simple Scripts - Page 1

Finding The Members of An AD Group

Finding the members of a group is very straightforward using PowerShell, if you know how. This is a task 1st and 2nd Line Teams do and need to do on a regular basis; when dealing with fault tickets. This little script is very easy to use and extremely basic in its construction, but is very useful. It allows the user to enter an AD group name and with a simple click of the 'Get Members' button and see the membership results.

This will allow quick analysis of the results to see if the user they are assisting is or is not a member. If they need to report the current members of that group to other parties; they can click the 'Export Results' button to produce a Grid View extract that can be copied into a spreadsheet. Also useful if the are many members. To make it easier to run these scripts, I package them into .exe windows applications. This means the 1st, 2nd staff just have to double click the exe file to run the program.

I use Sapien Tools' PowerShell Studio 2017 to package my scripts. If you do not have access PowerShell Studio, there is also an excellent script written by Ingo Karstein. This has now been excellently reworked by Markus Sholtes and available here.

Download The Script Here

Finding The Groups a User is a Member of

Finding the groups a user belongs to, using PowerShell, is straightforward; if you know how. Your 1st and 2nd Line Teams will do this on a regular basis, usually using the AD mmc, to check to see if the user belongs to the required group to gain access to data or an application. This little script is simple to use but none the less useful. Just enter the users ID (SAMAccountName) and click the 'Get Groups' button and see the results in the list box.

This little app will enable quick analysis of the results to see if the user they are assisting is in the correct groups etc. If you need to send the results to a 3rd party; simply click the 'Export Results' button to produce a Grid View of the results which can be transferred into a csv or xlxs file. To make it easier to run these scripts, I package them into .exe windows applications. This means the 1st, 2nd staff just have to double click the exe file to run the program.

I use Sapien Tools' PowerShell Studio 2017 to package my scripts. If you do not have access PowerShell Studio, there is also an excellent script written by Ingo Karstein. This has now been excellently reworked by Markus Sholtes and available here.

Download The Script Here